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Taylor Stitch: The Democratic Chino Reviewed

Taylor Stitch: The Democratic Chino Reviewed

TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE

The Taylor Stitch Democratic Chino
Tesher Cohen
June 4, 2020

Taylor Stitch

 

Today, we review the Taylor Stitch Democratic Chino. Based out of San Francisco’s Mission District, Taylor stitch has been around for a better part of a decade. Relatively small up until recently, the brand has gained prominence through its focus on delivering quality apparel with the least amount of environmental impact. At its very core, Taylor Stitch considers themselves to be a shirting company, having since branched through applying the same technical DNA to every single product made. Their brand’s motto says it best, “Responsibly Built for the Long Haul”.

Responsibly built for the long haul.
Photograph by Taylor Stitch via Taylorstitch.com

First Impressions:

Despite the brand being known for their shirting, my first purchase from the company was their Democratic fit Chinos (straight fit). What stands out most about the pants, is the simplicity in design and construction. On the outside, there aren’t any fancy frills. What you will find, is a map of San Francisco printed on the inside pockets which adds an interesting contrast if you need to find your way around San Francisco. Soft and well structured would be the best way to describe these. They are on the more casual side and a better paired with a t-shirt or un-tucked button down shirt.

“From the brass buttons to the custom YKK/Brass zipper and hardware, it’s clear that the team at TS didn’t cut corners”

Construction:

It’s clear that the team at Taylor Stitch dedicated a great deal of time in putting together a pair of chino’s worth selling. From the brass buttons to the custom YKK/Brass zipper and hardware, it’s clear that the team at TS didn’t cut corners. The material its self isn’t necessarily thick, and seems more suited for spring and summertime wear as opposed to winter. That said, the construction looks clean and sturdy enough to withstand whatever you throw at it. In terms of the overall quality, the two pairs I ordered showed no sign of fraying or loose threads which lends to the quality control.

Taylor stitch Democratic Chinos San Francisco Map
Photograph by Taylor Stitch via Taylorstitch.com

Fit:

Coming from someone who wears J. Crew, Bonobo’s, and Jomer’s, the fit of the democratic chino’s are in line with the  J. Crew 770 broken and the 770’s stretch chinos in terms of fabric and stretch to a lesser degree. The fit its self is very comfortable and although considered a straight fit, has a mild taper that similar to most modern fits. One thing that should be noted is that the standard inseam is 36”. Depending on your height and if you prefer to roll up your pants, this may be a non-issue. If you happen to live near a TS store, they will happily hem them for free and offer store credit if you provide a receipt from a local tailor.

Below, I provided a table illustrating the comparison between the Democratic Chinos and the J.Crew 770’s as a guide.

Waist label Waist Front Rise Upper Thigh Knee Leg opening Inseam
TS Slim 33 34.5 10.375 25 16.25 14.25 36
34 35.75 10.25 25.5 16.5 14.5 36
35 36.75 10.875 26 16.75 14.75 36
TS Democratic 33 34.75 10.75 25.5 17.75 15.75 36
34 35.75 11 26 18 16 36
35 36.75 11.25 26.5 18.25 16.25 36
J. Crew 770 Broken In 33 33.75 9.5 26.37 17.62 30 30
34 36.75 9.75 27 18 15 30

Conclusion:

The Taylor Stitch Democratic chinos are a very well rounded pair of pants. Between the workmanship, minimalist design, and interesting details, I would consider them to be worth the purchase. I have only had them for a couple of weeks now, and the softness of the material in conjunction with the slight stretch makes them comfortable to wear throughout the day. As someone who prefers simplicity when it comes to apparel, I’d line these a step up from J.Crew in terms of quality. If you are in the market for a pair of quality chino’s that get the job done, the Taylor Stitch Democratic chino’s are worth the purchase. I’d call these pants, “The Reliable s”.

Interested in purchasing a pair from Taylor Stitch? Use the referral link below to get 20% off your first purchase!

Taylor Stitch Referral Link

*Pro Tip: The chino’s come in a 36″ inseam which the team will happily hem for free if you are near one of their brick and mortar stores in San Francisco. If you choose to get them hemmed at a tailor near you, send the team a copy of your receipt and you will receive credit towards another purchase.

*Notable Mention: The team at TS was top notch, and the exchange functionality second to none. Returns were seamless with the website allowing you to immediately exchange for a different type/size and have it processed for shipping before you even return your initial purchase. Back to the review of the democratic chinos.

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Lifestyle and Travel

A Shout Out to Audio Engineers

A Shout Out to Audio Engineers

Image credits: Troy T

Six episodes into the All Things Interesting Podcast and I realize one thing. There are still sound issues, and I haven’t figured out how to completely work around them. It should go without saying that audio is one of if not the most important aspect of a podcast. In the opinions of many, a shows success can depend on if the audio is clear or an inaudible mess. Which brings me to my point. This is a shout out to all the audio engineers out there.

Now I covered the topic briefly in A Retrospective: Part 2, but feel it’ needs its own post. As much as the show is a continuous work in progress, I am thankful to have people around me supporting in a variety of ways. One of these individuals is Nick Voorhees, the found of the freelance branding platform, Melody Nest. An audio engineer by trade, Nick has been instrumental in the post production of my last few episodes. Being relatively new to the ins and outs of audio, I came to learn quickly that there is a whole lot more to the quality of your audio than just post processing.

As a quick case study, we were discussing my most recent episode with Jay Solomon and Nick pointed out a few segments of audio that were difficult to correct. Examples of these include background noise such as wrappers, people talking, lawnmowers, and even more subtle sounds such as knocking on a desk or moving the microphone. Despite being minor sources of sound, they pose a major problem for sound quality when it comes to listening.

Case in point, the first step to achieving the best quality is to make sure your environment is soundproof as possible. Not everyone has access to a studio, but there are ways to set yourself up for success. Some simple ways to do so include finding a quiet workspace, using a microphone arm and foam cover, and limiting feedback. Once you know that your environmental noise is limited as much as possible, it’s onto post processing.

Contrary to popular belief, post processing isn’t just editing. It is comprised of editing, mixing and mastering. Each focusing on organizing, balancing, and leveling, respectively. I won’t go into much detail here but will point to towards Buzzsprout’s article on the topic. Although post processing isn’t a magic bullet, the work that audio engineers do makes it seem like it is.

Let me preface this by saying that unless you are using top of the line equipment in a near perfect environment, there will be residual noise issues. This is where audio tools such as Audacity, Reaper, or Ableton come in; Or in my case, a sound expert such as Nick. From my own experience, audio engineering can be an incredibly arduous task. Between editing, mixing, mastering, and even audio repair; The process can take hours to complete. That’s not to say that you should go out and find yourself an audio engineer immediately. For those who are heavily invested in the content, I think it’s important to find someone who is heavily invested in the audio as well.

The message here is for there to be a greater appreciation for the work that audio engineers do. Whether it be editing podcasts, films, shows, or music. The work they do allows the quality of content to shine through and provides the best listening experience possible. After all, no one would watch their favorite TV show, or listen to their favorite music if it sounded like a potato. In a way, its why people invest so much money into high quality headphones and amps. To hear something the way it’s meant to be heard. If you can afford it, consider investing in one as they will always put their all into it. So next time you are working with an audio engineer on a project, take a second to recognize the great work they do.

For anyone looking for an audio engineer, I would highly recommend reaching out to Josh Hodos or Nick Vorhees!

Photopea.com: A free web-based alternative to Photoshop

Photopea.com: A free web-based alternative to Photoshop

An advanced image editor that works straight from your web browser and is free to use? Look out Photoshop, because there is a new sheriff in town. I recently had the chance to talk with the founder of Photopea.com, Ivan Kutskir on the All Things Interesting Podcast. On the episode, he shared more about Photopea and what makes it special. Initially built as a small project, Photopea.com has grown to become a full-fledged Photoshop alternative with over 3 million monthly users.

photopea.com

Advanced and Free

photopea vectorize image

For those who are used to using Photoshop, the platform shares all too familiar user interface. This would be a welcomed functionality for anyone that wants to quickly edit an image without having to relearn the tools. Unlike native software installed onto a desktop, Photopea is built directly into the browser. The features don’t stop there though. There is also native support for most file extensions, including .PSD files. Such functionality is a first of its kind and users will be able to mange and edit their images wherever they are.

Since seeing a rapid increase in popularity, Ivan Kutskir has taken on the project full time. Feature requests are constantly provided by the community and development continues on. Although not as feature rich as Photoshop, the platform supports its own set of unique features. Combined with many of the standard image editing features, Photopea should be enough to tackle most projects. What’s more is that it is free, with an option to remove Ads for $9.00/mo which goes directly to supporting the development.

A Great Option

If you are looking for an alternative to Photoshop or a platform to compliment it on the go, Photopea is a fantastic option. Not only is it supported on most machines and browsers, but it is also fully accessible on a mobile device if you are in a bind. All in all, I would highly recommend everyone give photopea.com. Check out my interview with him in which we talk all things photo editing, development and what’s next for Photopea.com!

Best Platform for Recording a Podcast?

Best Platform for Recording a Podcast?

I remember sorting through a few methods for recording the All Things Interesting Podcast which changed from one episode to the next before I ultimately settled on a solution that I felt was not only practical, but provided the best quality for my guest and I. Depending on how you are recording your show, different options will be available to you. To keep this fairly straight forward, I am going to focus this for individuals who are recording their show remotely. For a bit of reference here, my first episode with Kasian Franks of Vector Space AI was recorded three times using an assortment of different recording methods.

The Contenders

It’s true that there are a dozen or so options to record your podcast remotely which include Discord, Skype, Zencaster, Cast, Go To Meeting, Clear Cast , and the list goes on… I only used a handful of platforms I mentioned so to give an objective look at our options, I am going to run through these. One more thing to note, I spent quite a bit of time researching the options listed above when I first started my podcast.

Discord:

Discord is most well known for being a communication platform for gamers. What many don’t know though, is that Discord can also be used to record audio for your podcast using a little bot called “Craig“. With Craig, users are able to record multi channel audio with each user getting a separate downloadable file. What’s more is that each speakers audio is able to be modified on the fly which is one of the more important features across platforms. Now what makes Craig convenient for those looking to record their podcast compared to other platforms, is that its already embedded in a VOIP platform and provides a very easy to interface based on text commands.

On the downside, users often run into an assortment of issues such as intermittent call failures, lack of recording indicators which can can result in not capturing the full recording. All that said, Discord is a viable no frill options for anyone that is looking to put together a recording with no money down.

Skype:

With Skype’s recently added record feature, the platform is a no brainer for anyone who is looking to record both the audio and video of their show. Skype is a widely known application with simple functionality that anyone should be able to pick up in a matter of minutes. When it comes to quality, Skype would be a middle of the road option that is highly dependent on your connection quality. On a good day, your results will be a clear sounding MP3 recording (if you aren’t an audiophile) and you will be provided two recording too boot. One for your side and one for your guest. This is free and clear a great option if you manage to avoid any latency related issues during the call.

A couple of things to consider are that you are fairly restricted by the MP3 files as they are not recommended for post processing edits. Secondly, the output quality of both the audio and video are heavily dependent on your connection and backups are not provided in case of a call drop. That withstanding, I would recommend everyone who is starting off, to give Skype a try as it is free and easy to use.

ZenCaster

Being one of the most highly touted options on the r/podcasts Subreddit, I was eager to give Zencastr’s 30 day free trial a chance. What I came to find, was a platform that attempted to provide the podcast market a surefire solution but came up short in one major way. Let me be clear when I say this. Zencaster is a great option if you are looking for audio quality, ease of use, and accessibility. That is if you are willing to deal with the dreaded “audio drift” In the company’s defense, this is something they clearly cover in their FAQ section of their website. None the less, audio drift occurs when a recording exceeds a certain amount of time and both tracks become out of sync. This can cause a whole host of editing work to align the tracks together. I think it is important that people are aware of this as it took up quite a bit of time to re align the tracks, especially when you are paying a premium for the service.

All that aside, I think one of the best perks of ZenCaster is that they offer a subscription level which provides you with .wav formatted recordings. This makes it easy to download and drop into your preferable editing software for final post processing. Other features which stand out include live soundboard editing, and automatic post production. Unfortunately I did not use either of these features while running the trial subscription. All in all, if you can put up with the audio drift and premium cost, Zencastr is a solid option for the podcast aficionado.

Cast

Not as well-known as the aforementioned platforms, Try.Cast was mentioned sporadically on various Subedits as an alternative to many of the other recommended options. Being in the early phase of my podcast, I saw every platform as an option, and Cast is no exception. Similar to Zencaster, Cast offers a multiple tiered and multi feature platform that was designed directly for the hobbyist and pro podcasters alike. The Cast trial provides a 1 month test drive of the Hobby plan which provides 10 hours of recording time, unlimited editing and mixing, unlimited hosting, and one RSS feed. Seeing as I am only interested in the recording capabilities, the extra features would better suite those looking for an all in one solution. None the less, the Cast platform handles like a Toyota. Affordable, reliable, and gets you from point A to B. The platform is very well rounded in its functionality though there are a few minor gripes to be aware of.

The editing and mixing functionality is great in theory, but comes up short on accuracy and convenience relative to a standalone editing software such as Audacity. Now that is completely understandable if we were able to re upload our files into Cast for final mixing and optimization, which leads me to my second gripe. Although currently being discussed as a future feature, Cast does not currently support downloaded .wav files. This can be quite frustrating when you have to choose between an .mp3 and an editing functionality that feels largely disjointed. None the less, what Cast lacks in post processing editing, it makes up for in its competitive pricing, recording quality, and ability to avoid audio drift. If you are looking for something that is simple and gets the job done, Cast is a very solid option.

Verdict

In their own way, each of these options are a solid solution depending on what you are looking for as a podcaster. If you are looking to get up and running with minimal costs, options like Skype and Discord offer a no frills answer. If you have already forayed into the podcasting and are well on your way to the top spot on Apple Podcasts, Zencaster’s Pro Tier is a strong contender if you are recording remotely. That said, I believe that Cast offers the most well rounded middle of the road solution to anyone that is dipping their feet into podcasting and are looking for a well-priced and reliable platform for their recording needs.

For those interested in giving Cast a try, I have dropped in a link below.

Try Cast

As always, make sure to check out my prior write ups on starting a podcast! Start a Podcast: Part 1

A Quick Look at Vectorspace AI

A Quick Look at Vectorspace AI

Introduction

When I first started the All Things Interesting Podcast, my first guest was Kasian Franks who is the technical co-founder of the San Francisco based startup, Vectorspace AI. Also known by its ticker symbol (IDEX: VXV), Vectorspace AI uses Natural Language Understanding or NLU for short to produce feature vectors. These feature vectors serve the purpose of creating datasets which are correlation matrices designed to detect and extract hidden relationships across a spectrum of industries including the life sciences and financial markets.

As Kasian Franks put it, Vectorspace AI got its start going way back to the late 90’s and early 2000’s when his work at the time was focused on pattern matching algorithms which spawned early bio-mimetic search engine startups including SeeqPod, and Mimvi.

About Vector Space AI

Vector Space AI is a unique platform that aims to drive quicker and higher quality results in data science by leveraging context controlled Natural Language processing and feature engineering. Feature vectors are constituted into smart basket data sets which are powered with artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms to drive better solutions for generating alpha for the world’s leading funds, research groups, institutions, and vendors. At the core of the platform, Vectorspace AI is backed by multiple patents by the team in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the area of Natural Language Processing/Understanding (NLP/NLU) and Machine Learning (ML).

On the front of blockchain, the team seeks to enable companies to onboard with VXV based on its API service to allow companies to conduct active real-time data analysis. The company provides a multi-tiered subscription service which provides varied degrees of services and high-value datasets based on VXV token holdings. Further augmenting the platform, the company created a data provenance pipeline (DPP) to allow companies to track their data back to its source and to understand its reliability.

Outlook

From my discussions with Vectorspace AI and research into the company and its history, VXV has shaped an interesting niche for itself in the market. With use cases spanning from pharmaceutical research to generating alpha in the financial markets, the platform and token model offer a great deal of potential to institutions seeking to employ sophisticated and cutting-edge machine learning and AI solutions to their enterprise. With the recent vote of confidence by Elastic (NYSE: ESTC) through their article presenting the use of VXV data sets on their Canvas platform, the project is one keep an eye on.

Closing Thoughts

For those interested in learning more about the history of Vectorspace AI, be sure to check out episode 1 of The All Things Interesting podcast in which we sit down to talk all thing data, machine learning, blockchain, and Elastic. Stay tuned for new posts

For more on Elastic and Vectorspace AI, check out www.elastic.co and www.vectorspace.ai

Starting a Podcast l A Retrospective Part: 2

Starting a Podcast l A Retrospective Part: 2

Starting a Podcast l A Retrospective: Part 2

In the final part of our two-part retrospective, we are looking back at the first episode of The All Things Interesting Podcast.

First and foremost, it is important to take a step back and congratulate oneself on a job well done. After all, quite a bit of time went into researching, planning, coordinating, re-recording, and post process editing the episode before launching.

As I sit here writing this while re-watching the classic anime Cowboy Bebop in the background, the single most important takeaway from the first episode, is the number 3. Not the number 3 as in how I would rate in on a scale of 1 to 10 or the number of cups of coffee I drank to get amped up for the show. More like the number of recordings it took to record the first episode of the show.

What makes this poignant is that these were all full-length hour and a half recording that took place, only to be invalidated due to a host of issues. You may be asking yourself right now, “Why is he telling us this?”, and the answer to that would be to teach you a very simple lesson. “Always measure twice and cut once”. If for some reason you still find yourself multiple recordings in, the second lesson is to measure and adjust accordingly. The last thing we “want” to do when creating an episode, is to be caught up in re-recordings. Sometimes we may be forced to due to the very nature of things, and that is alright. None the less, checking and rechecking your equipment prior to recording will save you and your guests a lot of headaches down the road.

Now imagine you forget to double check your equipment and you end up on the same boat. That’s alright too, because now you can do even better! You see, the point I’m trying to impart here is that whether you are recording a podcast, training for that underwater basket weaving competition, or doing standup; there is always a silver lining and lesson to be learned from everything in life! That said, we are going to take a deeper look at what lessons I learned from this episode and what I can recommend to others starting their own.

Lesson 1: Check, Double Check, and Check Again

You often will hear the phrase “Testing 1 2 3” when someone is testing the microphone and equipment prior to a speech or musical set. On the first attempt, we faced a host of technical issues ranging from faulty equipment and faulty software to poor planning and execution all around. Once we went back to the drawing board, the second recording came out very well done… That is until we realized we only managed to record one track of audio. As the old adage says, third times the charm, sort of. Although we managed to put together a complete recording, I found myself settling on the reality that it wasn’t terrible, but it wasn’t great. Minus the persistent sound issues and poor post editing, the content was there, which is what mattered most.

By the same token, I came to realize a few truths as well. Sometimes we find ourselves taking a step forward in life only to take two steps back. Not because we are necessarily regressing, but because we failed to trust the process and focus on the detail in that moment. The second is that it is completely ok to fail, as long as you fail forward! Your first live run may not live up to expectations, regardless if you practiced 100 times before but you have to start somewhere! Always seek to measure, adjust, and retest until you find accuracy and balance in your recordings.

Lesson 2: Where are My Notes!?

One of the biggest pieces of feedback I received after launching my first episode was that the conversation was rigid at times. Now, this will completely depend on your style of communication and can even be a result of first time jitters when recording for the first time. In my case, I found myself shuffling between focusing on the conversation and sifting through my notes to find a question I wanted to ask. When this happens, a conversation loses its natural flow and becomes a jumbled game of tennis. One way I plan on improving dialogue flow issues is to start off the conversation with some general banter before diving into the heavy hitting topics. Doing so will help to build a bit of rapport and allow questions to naturally form as the conversations goes on.

Lesson 3: Can You Hear Me Now?

By and large, the most common feedback I received from my first episode was in regards to the volume EQ across the episode. Some parts of the audio sounded great while others required the listener to blast the audio on full to barely hear what was being said. Now, I am no audio expert by any stretch of the imagination so I’ll leave it at that. For those of you who decide to use dedicated audio recording software though, I would highly recommend you learn a thing or two about audio levels before doing any post process editing. Going to town on audio filters was a terrible decision in retrospect and I will be putting an emphasis on improving sound optimization moving forward.

Closing Thoughts:

When it really comes down to it, have fun with the process and keep on learning. Your first attempt at something will never be your greatest, but if you can keep moving forward, you may find yourself doing very good at it. As I look towards Episode 2, the goal is to make minor adjustments for accuracy and to test again until I am able to find that happy medium in terms of quality and content. As a final note, this post did not contain much if at all any technical analysis of equipment or software, and for good reason. Sometimes the best way to learn is to roll up your sleeves and to dig into all the available information on the internet. If we take the time to understand how something really works, we will not only find the tools that fit our needs but that will help us succeed.

Starting a Podcast l A Retrospective Part: 1

Starting a Podcast l A Retrospective Part: 1

At first glance, venturing into starting my first website and podcast from start to completion seemed like a simple task. What could be more difficult than purchasing a microphone, recording some audio, and uploading it to Itunes or any of the other countless hosting platforms? The realist would say it’s not, and they would already be onto their 20th episode by now. In reality, that is not the way it worked out, at least for me. So what is it exactly that makes creating a podcast and its accompanying website so difficult?

The Idea Stage:

If I were to point out a single point of failure when it comes to developing a podcast, I would immediately point to the Idea of it. Not the idea of putting together a podcast, but every idea that makes up the podcast. That can be anything ranging from the name of the show to the topic of discussion and every conceivable supporting element such as a website, social media, and even hosting. You could be 10 miles down the road with your podcast off of a haste decision, only to realize that maybe the parts don’t fit together as you thought they would. It is that realization that results in strenuous rework that can drag out the development and ultimately your patience. I remember spending around 2 months procrastinating starting my podcast all because I couldn’t settle on a name. Even now as I look back, I am not entirely settled on it but here is the one key lesson I took away from it. That lesson is to “Commit”. It’s the word that will not only set the wheels in motion but the one that will propel you forward. The reality is that no detail has to necessarily be perfect to a T. After all, no one is going to care if your website font is Ariel or Verdana and especially if your logo is centered or left aligned on your website. We often here the quote “The devil is in the details”. Nothing is worse than spending countless hours or even days attempting to perfect a single section on your website only to realize that you have been spinning your wheels the whole time by fixing issues. Commit to a name, commit to a topic, and deliver the best content possible. Everything else can be built around it at a later period in time.

Choosing the Right Equipment:

I spent countless scouring the internet and Reddit for the best starter audio equipment to get the podcast off the ground. I collected dozens of posts and articles, each pointing me in so many directions that by the end of it all, I did not know which way was up. In fact, I left more lost and confused than when I started. Sometimes we simply get too caught up in the idea of what we need, that we lose track of what it really is that we need to put ourselves in a position to succeed. We put up more questions than answers, and more walls than roads that we end up not gaining any traction. There were countless times in which the advice I received was to purchase a simple microphone and record, but I was determined to have all of the questions answered before making a decision. What resulted, was weeks in wasted time, only to come full circle and purchase a simple microphone. The key takeaway here is to not fear failure and to go the simplest route.  By seeking perfection from the get go, we prevent ourselves from truly learning and from having fun with what we are doing. Keep it simple and be alright with failing forward towards your goals. Remember, you must learn to walk before you can run. To make it easy for any prospective podcasters, I recommend the Audio Technica AT-2005USB microphone and have provided a link below.

AT2005USB Microphone (Non-affiliate)

Building a Website and Hosting Episodes:

For anyone that is interested in getting a podcast off the ground in a matter of days as opposed to months, I highly suggest you skip the website and make a B line straight for a podcast hosting service such as Libsyn, Pinecast, Blubrry, or one of the many other options out there. Unfortunately I decided to play this on hard mode by also building a website in my free time to supplement the hosting of my episodes and blog content. In retrospect this was a questionable decision, but I committed and I needed to see that decision through; whether it resulted in success or failure. As I mentioned prior, focus on the main goal and circle back to supporting elements as you get further down the road. People are more interested in the 10 episodes you created than the fancy looking website and 1 episode you created. In many cases, hosting services will provide you with a simple website depending on the pricing tier you are under. When juggling the many possible tasks at hand, always look at it as “less is more”. Keep it simple and keep it straight forward by leveraging a hosting service to handle your podcast, website, and RSS feeds to publish your content on a variety of platforms.

Putting It All Together:

When I wrote this, I was still sorting through a backlog of website design and hosting related issues that were taking precedent over the launching of my podcast. In a perfect world, I would have had a perfect website, top of the line equipment, and a list of guests on the top 100 most interesting people in the world… Fortunately, that isn’t the case. You see, the fun of making a podcast is in the journey of putting it all together. It doesn’t have to be perfect, and it doesn’t need to have the best of everything up front. If you really want to start one, it boils down to three simple things:

  1. Purchase a  simply microphone (assuming you have a pair of headphones and recording software)
  2. Source a hosting platform for your shows episodes on any number of platforms
  3. Create strong content (including a logo)

Granted the above is an over simplification of putting a podcast together, but it really is all you need to get your show up and running. No fancy equipment or website will ever take the place of an individual with a microphone in one hand and powerful content in the other.

Thanks for reading and look out out for part 2 of this blog in which I provide a retrospective on my first episode!

An Intro to All Things Interesting

An Intro to All Things Interesting

What is All Things Interesting?

I became enamored with the idea of started a podcast back in 2017 while sitting in my cubicle at work, listening to the Joe Rogan Podcast. It was not my first time listening to his show nor podcast, but it was the first time I came to the realization that it was something I wanted to pursue. It wasn’t the main driving force behind my decision, it was the inspiration that set the wheels in motion. Growing up and even to this day, I have a propensity to ask people questions. Not in the getting to know you type of way, but more of the “I’m going to interrogate you as if you just committed a crime and I am trying to get an admission of guilt out of you type of way”. Not the most tactful way to go about a conversation, but it’s something I have been working on improving over the years. Besides, what better way to improve your communication skills than to interview people you have never met before?

Jokes aside, I have a keen interest in people. Whether it be their life story, the work they do, or their thoughts on life as a whole, I gravitate towards each interaction as if I was discovering something for the first time. Each conversation with individuals I have met over the years has always brought about something novel and interesting that I have not heard before. It is because of this, that I want to help share these fascinating conversations with the rest of the world. No matter what it is that you do or where you’re from, I believe that everyone has a unique story worth sharing. Without the Joe Rogan Experience or the Tim Ferris Show, I wouldn’t of have been exposed to the interesting individuals and thoughts that shape our world. To them, I owe the inspiration to pursue The All Things Interesting Podcast.

Taylor Stitch: The Democratic Chino Reviewed

Taylor Stitch: The Democratic Chino Reviewed

The Taylor Stitch Democratic Chino Tesher Cohen Taylor Stitch   Today, we review the Taylor Stitch Democratic Chino. Based out of San Francisco’s Mission District, Taylor stitch has been around for a better part of a decade. Relatively small up until recently,...

A Shout Out to Audio Engineers

A Shout Out to Audio Engineers

Image credits: Troy T Six episodes into the All Things Interesting Podcast and I realize one thing. There are still sound issues, and I haven’t figured out how to completely work around them. It should go without saying that...

Best Platform for Recording a Podcast?

Best Platform for Recording a Podcast?

I remember sorting through a few methods for recording the All Things Interesting Podcast which changed from one episode to the next before I ultimately settled on a solution that I felt was not only practical, but provided the best quality for my guest and I....

A Quick Look at Vectorspace AI

A Quick Look at Vectorspace AI

Introduction When I first started the All Things Interesting Podcast, my first guest was Kasian Franks who is the technical co-founder of the San Francisco based startup, Vectorspace AI. Also known by its ticker symbol (IDEX: VXV), Vectorspace AI uses Natural Language...

Starting a Podcast l A Retrospective Part: 2

Starting a Podcast l A Retrospective Part: 2

Starting a Podcast l A Retrospective: Part 2 In the final part of our two-part retrospective, we are looking back at the first episode of The All Things Interesting Podcast. First and foremost, it is important to take a step back and congratulate oneself on a job well...

Starting a Podcast l A Retrospective Part: 1

Starting a Podcast l A Retrospective Part: 1

At first glance, venturing into starting my first website and podcast from start to completion seemed like a simple task. What could be more difficult than purchasing a microphone, recording some audio, and uploading it to Itunes or any of the other countless hosting...

An Intro to All Things Interesting

An Intro to All Things Interesting

What is All Things Interesting? I became enamored with the idea of started a podcast back in 2017 while sitting in my cubicle at work, listening to the Joe Rogan Podcast. It was not my first time listening to his show nor podcast, but it was the first time I came to...

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